Nov 182015
A Family Affair

It’s a lot easier to say change isn’t easy than it is to experience change yourself.  I recently found this out firsthand when I said goodbye to friends, residents and coworkers at Brookdale Hillsborough, where I served as the Clare Bridge program manager for two years. In becoming the new executive director at Brookdale Hamilton, I wouldn’t be far away geographically, but away from the “family” I had grown to love. Clare Bridge is Brookdale’s […]

Oct 272015
My Care Partner Is My Hero

I first met my now-wife Shannon at work. I was her supervisor, and since she knew the responsibilities of the department inside and out, I leaned on her for assistance. We started to get to know each other on a more personal level and then we started dating. She asked me out – I had no idea she liked me in that way! After dating for some time, she took me to Disney World and […]

Oct 272015
A Note to Caregivers from Dan Gasby

Two years ago, when B. got her diagnosis, I made the same assumption that almost all newcomers to this challenging subject do. I thought it was all about the loved one who now had Alzheimer’s. She was the patient — or maybe the word I used more often was “victim.” She was, and she is. But the challenge, I came to see, was just as formidable for me as it was for her. I don’t […]

Oct 222015
10 Life Lessons My Mother Continues to Teach Me as She Lives with Alzheimer’s

1. Things that seem so important to us in our everyday lives just are not. Mom thought it was important that she follow the strict rules of her religion. She had to wear a skirt every day, as well as have her long hair in a bun. Mom never ever wore jewelry and rarely watched TV. Guess what? The aides put her hair in a ponytail, and she wears the Mardi Gras beads that she […]

Sep 282015
We Are In This Together

Four years ago, Mom quit her job so that she could come help me with my twin boys after they were born. I was an exhausted first-time mom who had no clue what I was doing. It was a huge relief to have her by my side during that time. I started to notice little things about Mom that were different; rather than read too much into anything, I figured that we were both just […]

Sep 112015
My Sweet Melinda

Of the 5 million people in this country living with Alzheimer’s, about 200,000 have younger-onset/early-onset Alzheimer’s. It is not an “old person’s” disease. Some people are diagnosed in their 30s, 40s or 50s. One of them was my wife – my sweet Melinda. Melinda is the reason I Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Melinda was once a trial lawyer, a scratch baker, an excellent cook, needlepointer, crafter and seamstress. These talents, along with her incredible intellect, engaging smile, […]

Jun 262015
I Am More than My Diagnosis

Tim, diagnosed with Frontotemporal dementia in 2012, living with HIV Working in information technology and then for many years as a part of a management team, my career was very important to me. At the end of 2009, however, I realized that I was having trouble focusing on my job, and one day after a lunchtime walk, I felt like I had lost sight in one of my eyes. Thinking it was due to stress, […]

May 142015
Mother and Child

When I presented Mom with her birthday present, I couldn’t get my phone to record her reaction. The present was a big frame with eight photos of our family, and she loved it. So, what did I do? I took back the present, waited about 10 minutes, and gave it to her again. This time I filmed it—the same, wondrous reaction to seeing all her loved ones is now recorded. I’m both amused and horrified […]

Feb 132015
Bringing Awareness and Support to the Court: University of Maryland Basketball Coach’s Wife on Why She’s Fighting to End Alzheimer’s

Mark’s basketball career has spanned the entirety of our 20-year marriage. We have moved a lot – experiencing an ever-changing landscape of varying cities, schools, friends and basketball seasons, with invariable ups and downs. My role in Mark’s career has always been to find stability in these times of change, drawing from my relationship with my family. Some changes, however, are harder to face than others. Nearly nine years ago, my father died of younger-onset […]

Dec 222014
Sense and Sensitivity 

When my mother Naomi was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2010 at the age of 70, my father, Jack, actually started cooking for the first time in his life. Through the painful realization that we were losing our beloved mom and wife, we found humor in the situation. My father had actually entered the kitchen! This post is an excerpt from The Lost Kitchen: An Alzheimer’s Memoir and Cookbook, which chronicles the story of how my family struggled to maintain […] main site  |  Research  |  Advocacy  |  Care and support  |  Message boards  |  Disclaimer  |  Donate  |  Contact us  |  Sign up for e-news
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