Nov 252013
 

When it comes to caring fwoman sleeps on the sofaor a parent, spouse or other loved one, sleep is not for beauty. It is essential to maintain health and the energy needed to be a caregiver. Uninterrupted, restorative sleep (7 to 9 hours) is recommended by most experts.

But for many of the nation’s 65 million family caregivers, sleep is an elusive luxury.  In fact, a National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) study on caregiver health risks found 87 percent of those caregivers surveyed suffered from insomnia.

If you suffer from insomnia or sleep deprivation, you are at risk for numerous health issues. According to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), more than 50 percent of people older than age 65 suffer sleep disorders that ultimately shorten their lives. This deprivation of sleep is called sleep debt. In an interview with WebMD, Susan Zafarlotfi, Ph.D., clinical director of the Institute for Sleep and Wake Disorders at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey, said, “Sleep debt is like credit card debt. If you keep accumulating credit card debt, you will pay high interest rates or your account will be shut down until you pay it all off. If you accumulate too much sleep debt, your body will crash.”

Insomnia typically is a function of not being able to relax our minds and our bodies. To get some sleep, try these tips from Dr. Lawrence J. Epstein, associate physician, Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard University:

1. Create a sleep-inducing environment: a dark, quiet, comfortable and cool room.

2. Do not use your bedroom for anything other than sleep or sex. No television, no laptops.

3. Make sure you do not eat at least two to three hours before bedtime, and avoid caffeine or alcohol close to bedtime. Note that smoking can cause trouble sleeping.

4. If you are tossing and turning at night and you cannot get those eyes closed, try drinking green or chamomile tea before bed or put a lavender pillow near your head to aid relaxation.

5. Create consistent sleep and wake schedules, even on weekends. Our bodies have internal clocks called circadian rhythms that synchronize our active and rest states with biochemical reactions in our bodies. Circadian rhythms are based on light/dark cycles, with light having the most impact on our ability to get to and stay in restorative sleep.

For caregivers, it is time to awaken to the fact that sleep may be your best medicine.  Sleep well.

Excerpted from A Cast of Caregivers – Celebrity Stories to Help You Prepare to Care by Sherri Snelling (Balboa Press).

 

About the Author 

Sherri Snelling, CEO and founder of the Caregiving Club and author of “A Cast of Caregivers – Celebrity Stories to Help You Prepare to Care,” is a nationally recognized expert on America’s 65 million family caregivers with special emphasis on how to help caregivers balance “self-care” while caring for a loved one.  She is the former chairman of the National Alliance for Caregiving.

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Dec 232011
 

There are some topics on our message boards that pop up to surprise us, while others follow a pretty predictable cycle.

Every year, around the holidays, calls to our helpline and posts on our message boards indicate many family members notice the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease or advancing dementia. This is especially true of out-of-town family members who don’t see the person with dementia every day; they compare behaviors to previous times — and the difference may be startling.

The out-of-town family member may react by offering uninvited advice and opinions to family members who are dealing with dementia on a daily basis. And that’s when we see posts like this one:

“How dare she fly in here from thousands of miles away and say what our mother needs. I’m the one who does everything every day for her. Who does she think she is?!”

I think that it’s very natural to resent the advice of someone who is less aware of the daily needs of the person with Alzheimer’s and how much work it can take to meet those needs as the disease advances. But what’s harder to do is to accept that these family members are offering caregivers something very valuable – something that they cannot provide for themselves. They are offering perspective.

When you’re very close to something and looking at it, you see all the details. You can see the lines and veins in a leaf, for example, only when you’re close to it. You can see the effect of a slight breeze as it meets the leaf and moves it, even slightly. But what you can’t see, is the size of that leaf with respect to the whole tree — or a whole forest. For that perspective, you need some distance. And distance is something that daily caregiving just doesn’t allow.

So when the family gets together and someone offers opinions from a more distant viewpoint, it can help to try to see it as information that reflects a different perspective — one that can only be seen clearly when the viewer isn’t too close to the details. And sometimes, that view can even encourage caregivers to take a step back and incorporate additional resources they may not have considered before.

For the holidays,  a little perspective can be a wonderful gift.

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Today’s guest post comes from Ellen Carbonell, LCSW, Associate Director, Family Programs for the Alzheimer’s Association’s national office.  Ellen is responsible for developing and producing dementia-related family programs for chapter implementation nationwide, and oversees the caregiver and early-stage support group programs. Trained as a clinical social worker, she has over 30 years of experience working with individual and family programs in mental health, vocational, educational, clergy and voluntary health care settings.

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