Oct 292012
 

I always say, if you’ve met one person with Alzheimer’s—then you’ve met one person with Alzheimer’s. Many people don’t realize how each individual has a unique experience with the disease—unique symptoms, a unique path to diagnosis and unique needs.

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and National Family Caregiver Month, and as a member of the Alzheimer’s Association National Early-Stage Advisory Group, I’m proud to share my story to help raise awareness of disease and those affected.

A year ago, at age 62, I was working as a third-grade teacher when I noticed I was having problems with balance and gait. As a two-time breast cancer survivor, I went to see my doctor, who suspected the cancer had returned and spread to my brain. You can imagine my shock and devastation when a series of tests revealed I had Alzheimer’s disease.

It took me a long time to come to terms with the diagnosis, but I found solace and support in the Alzheimer’s Association. I decided that while I was still able, I had to “Get real” with the details of my diagnosis and start planning for the future.

Although I retired from teaching, my background in education has been a great benefit in my journey with Alzheimer’s. In my previous job as a principal, I adopted the habit of taking copious notes, writing down conversations I had with parents, students and teachers. Now, I use that same practice to stay on top of my day-to-day activities. I write down everything in a notebook I carry with me: what I did, who I saw, what I said, the names of doctors and books I want to read. I stay active in the field of education by tutoring and working at after-school programs.

My life with Alzheimer’s is somewhat unique because I live alone. To keep myself safe, I have routines—I have a specific place where I keep my keys and I have a process to make sure the stove is turned off every night. Right now, I am still in the early stage of the disease, and very independent.

I’m grateful for the opportunity I have to plan for the future. I know there will come a day when I can no longer care for myself or manage my own finances. My brother-in-law has power of attorney, and I’ve started to visit long-term care facilities in my area.

I’m fortunate to have found a steady source of support in my friend Jean. We taught together for a couple of years before my diagnosis, but I don’t know what I’d do without her now.  She keeps me social by inviting me to everything—and I mean everything! We read books and go to the movies together and discuss them. She sends me notes about things I might find interesting—just this morning, she emailed and told me to read the opinion column on the stimulus plan in our newspaper.  She makes me homemade chicken rice soup and chili. We have tickets to see “Jersey Boys” together later this month. 

In short, she is a beautiful person, inside and out. She nurtures my soul.

This November, I’m thinking of all of those facing Alzheimer’s, going through their own unique experiences with the disease—and of the many caregivers whose love and support is the most valuable gift of all. 

Learn More:

Janice Pfeilschifter lives in Aberdeen, North Carolina and is a member of the 2012 Alzheimer’s Association National Early-Stage Advisory Group. As an advisor, she hopes to share the perspective that life does not end with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alz.org main site  |  Research  |  Advocacy  |  Care and support  |  Message boards  |  Disclaimer  |  Donate  |  Contact us  |  Sign up for e-news
© 2011 Alzheimer's Association | Blog Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha