Jan 222014
 

Charles WarnerTwo years ago, at the age of 69, I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Shortly after receiving the diagnosis, I began to think a lot about the future. The more I thought about the future, the more I realized that I needed to implement plans for the inevitable progression of the disease while I had the ability to do so. This also seemed much more proactive than just sitting around worrying about having Alzheimer’s.

Prior to my diagnosis, I was a practicing attorney in civil litigation for 45 years.  During my career, I did not worry too much about what the future held for me and my family. I simply assumed that I would sell my law practice, and, on occasion, hire myself out as a private mediator of legal disputes. I had been working as a mediator for many years and was certain that I would continue after I closed my actual law office. That, of course, did not turn out as expected.

Accept Your Diagnosis        

As a person living with Alzheimer’s, I have learned that acceptance is essential in making meaningful plans for the future. I know it may be difficult, but accepting the reality of the diagnosis is absolutely necessary to enable those of us living in the early stage of the disease to take the appropriate steps to plan for the future. You want to do this now while you still have the capacity to make your wishes known and have them memorialized in legal documents. While it is important to plan for the future, do not let the fear of the future ruin the life you can live now before the disease progresses.

What does it mean to “plan for the future?” In my opinion, among other things, this means to see to your estate planning. Estate planning is the preparation of wills, trusts, advanced health care directives, and generally what you wish to have happen with all of your assets and possessions upon incapacity and/or death. Collaboration with a legal professional is not required in order to plan for your legal and financial future. You can find copies of advance directives and other estate planning forms through the American Bar Association, office supply stores and your state’s health department or local library.

If you choose to work with a professional, a well-qualified legal advisor can help you prepare the required documents.  Locate an elder law attorney who has expertise in the preparation of the documents necessary to carry out your wishes as to the disposition of your real and personal property. Attorneys doing this type of work usually describe themselves as having expertise in “Estates and Trusts.”

Family and Financial Matters

Discuss your estate plan with your family.  Make a list of the assets you possess. What are they worth? Use the legal and financial worksheet to help you organize this information and share it with your family or your lawyer of choice.

I personally found a great deal of peace in completing the legal documents. It has been completed and implemented now and I no longer have to worry about it. Those of us with Alzheimer’s are better off looking at what we have left… not obsessing about that we have lost.

 

Chuck Warner is a member of the Alzheimer’s Association 2013 National Early-Stage Advisory Group (ESAG). He encourages others living with the disease to be actively involved in planning for their future and engage in a fulfilling life. “An Alzheimer’s diagnosis feels like the end of the world, but it’s not – you can make a difference.”

 

Learn more:

Alz.org main site  |  Research  |  Advocacy  |  Care and support  |  Message boards  |  Disclaimer  |  Donate  |  Contact us  |  Sign up for e-news
© 2011 Alzheimer's Association | Blog Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha