Nov 172016
 

My experience with Alzheimer’s started in 2001. My grandfather (my father’s father) died of what was first described to me as senility. I was in my early 20s and thought nothing of it; people in their 80s just forgot things.

It was not until 2009 or 2010 that I started to pay closer attention. We later discovered that my grandfather had had dementia. That’s when I also learned that my grandparents on my mother’s side of the family – both my grandmother and grandfather – also had a form of the disease. My living grandfather has early stage Alzheimer’s. My grandmother was diagnosed with senior dementia.williamwalk

This cause is important to me not only because my grandparents have the disease, but also because I am a financial advisor with Edward Jones, and I work with families currently living with this disease. Over the years, Edward Jones has helped many families work toward their financial goals, many of whom have dealt with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

It wasn’t until January 2016, when Edward Jones announced it was stepping forward to become the National Presenting Sponsor of Walk to End Alzheimer’s, that I learned about the many resources provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, including educational and outreach programs right here in my own backyard (Reno). I now actively share this information so that members of my community are aware that the Alzheimer’s Association is in local communities and here to help them!

Getting involved was surprisingly simple. When Edward Jones asked about helping with local outreach at Walk to End Alzheimer’s, I responded immediately. They put me in touch with my local Alzheimer’s Association chapter and offered me a position as a volunteer for our local Walk. In addition to helping the Alzheimer’s Association, this also gave me the opportunity to learn more about the resources available to help my grandparents and my clients.

As part of my personal commitment:

  • I’m now the mission chair for the Reno Walk to End Alzheimer’s.
  • I serve as the Edward Jones Northern Nevada regional coordinator for the Walk partnership. I’m proud of Edward Jones’ $4.7 million commitment over two years to support the mission of the Alzheimer’s Association. As part of that commitment, the Alzheimer’s Association will work with Edward Jones to create the Edward Jones Alzheimer’s Research Fund, a targeted effort to advance research toward methods of treatment, prevention and, ultimately, a cure at a quicker pace. The Alzheimer’s Association will provide education programs to associates at Edward Jones, and will work to ensure Edward Jones associates are equipped to share the resources of the Alzheimer’s Association with their clients.
  • I volunteer with the Community Foundation of Western Nevada Caregiver Support Initiative.
  • And, I volunteer with AskSara, a free contact service for individuals facing life changes, such as caring for aging parents.

Photo courtesy BMW Photography

I want my family to be safe and sound, and I want to tell my clients – many of whom have become friends – that to know that they aren’t alone when facing this disease. Thanks to what seems like fate, I’m proud to say I work with this great organization and plan to continue until there is a cure.

About the Author: William Palmer is an Edward Jones financial advisor in Reno, NV and mission chair for the Reno Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

Group photo courtesy BMW Photography.

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Nov 102016
 

2016 marks the 5th year I have walked in Walk to End Alzheimer’s. This year, I was lucky to walk with friends and family, but there is one person I wish could walk with me – and I simultaneously realize that if she was here, I wouldn’t have the same compelling reason to walk. That person is my mom.

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When I was 15, my mom was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 50.

The once bold and fiercely independent woman I knew quickly became a stranger to me. At first it was the little things, like forgetting to pick me up from school, or getting confused on a drive home from the airport. Then one day when I was 16, she looked me in the eye and asked: “What’s your name again?”

The day of my graduation, my mom refused to get ready, insisting that the clothing my dad had laid out for her was “for children.” At the last minute, she changed her mind and decided to join us. On our way home, we decided to stop to get some dessert to celebrate. As we made our way to the table to sit down, my mom started yelling at my dad: “I’m not going with him! He hits me! I am not going with him!” A moment of silence followed as we decided what to do.

alexmomWith Alzheimer’s, there is this inclination to hold onto what is “normal.”

That night after graduation and all throughout my mom’s fight with Alzheimer’s, my family and I fought the battle of how to maintain “normalcy.” That night, normalcy was having dessert with my family, because if my mom could make it through dessert, then maybe things would be okay. We could do what “normal” families do. Unfortunately, there is nothing normal about what Alzheimer’s does to a person.

We didn’t have dessert that night. 

My family could feel the eyes of the restaurant guests on us as my mom continued to yell out, and all we could do was smile a little with tears in our eyes as we reassured her: “It’s okay. We’re going to home, and it will be okay.”

On October 3, 2011, my mom passed away.

After her 10-year battle, she finally got to rest. Although I can’t change the fact that my mom isn’t here  –  and I can’t help but be glad that she’s no longer in pain or scared – I refuse to accept that her fight is over. I am now the one who has to fight. One way I choose to fight is by walking to raise money and awareness for Alzheimer’s research.

So why do I fight? Why do I walk each year, and look forward to future Walks?

I walk in honor and memory of my mom. I walk because I don’t want to have to walk for my friends…and I don’t want them to have to walk for me.

alexwithfriendsI also walk because I long to see the first survivor at a future Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Although I feel energized as I meet other people who are as committed to eliminating Alzheimer’s as I am, I wish we didn’t even have to think about Alzheimer’s as a threat.

The only way we’re going to get there is if we continue to raise money and awareness to end Alzheimer’s for good – and keep fighting. This year’s Chicago Walk is over, but I’ll be back next year; I will keep walking, and I hope you will too.

About the Author:  Together with her family and friends, Alexandra Magiera participated in Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Chicago, Illinois. You can visit Alexandra’s Walk page here.

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Oct 132016
 

When my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, I was a healthcare professional working in assisted living. I didn’t have much personal experience with dementia or first-hand knowledge of what it would be like to walk with someone on this journey. Suddenly, it became my mother’s journey and, eventually, my story as well.sheila-1

My sisters and I bought every book we could find about this terrible disease. “You read these three, I’ll read these four.” We felt desperate to learn as much as we could to help our mother. The books, along with the Alzheimer’s Association’s website and blog, were so helpful to us! I remember reading about the stages of the disease, and I could see my mother’s path in front of me.

That path led us to Walk to End Alzheimer’s. How wonderful to have an actual event to share with others on this journey! Whether you’re a person living with Alzheimer’s or family members representing and supporting loved ones, Walk is a place where you connect with people who truly understand the challenge and heartbreak of this disease. You feel less alone when you realize you aren’t the only one fighting this battle. True strength in numbers!

In 2010, my sister, Pam Lindsey, and I gladly volunteered to be on the publicity committee for Walk and the annual fundraising banquet. Pam documented Walk in a special video, as well as a song that I wrote for my mother and performed at the banquet. We felt it was a special way to honor her and all the other families struggling with Alzheimer’s.

After going on this journey with my mother, I knew I wanted to help others who were on this same daunting path. I was grateful for the opportunity to come to work at Brookdale Senior Living’s Belle Meade location, where a true continuum of care for those with dementia is available. I’ve now joined my co-workers as part of Brookdale Senior Living’s National Walk team. I’m very proud to be part of a company that is so involved with a great cause.

sheila-2It’s both exciting and comforting to attend an event that renews everyone’s passion for this rapidly growing cause. Every day I remember the devastation that Alzheimer’s disease has brought to my family in losing my mother, grandmother, mother-in-law and her mother as well. I am grateful to the Alzheimer’s Association for all they do to help so many.

I know my mother would be happy to know that our story helps others. I have her photo on my desk so that those I help can see the woman who inspires me to do this every day. I lead two monthly support groups to help families deal with the loss, grief and unmerited guilt that comes when they realize that they can no longer care for their loved one at home. I try to help them understand that in getting professional help, they are not doing this to their beloved, but for them. For those fighting Alzheimer’s disease, there is still a life to be lived while focusing on what they still can do, instead of what they can’t.

As I remember my mother’s battle with Alzheimer’s, I remember her courage, strength and bravery which set my life on a path I could have never imagined. That path is to help as many families who struggle with the disease as I can. Her fight continues through me.

About the Author:  Sheila Uselton is the director of sales and marketing at Brookdale Belle Meade in Nashville, TN. Walk to End Alzheimer’s – Nashville is on October 15.

Sep 292016
 

The memories of our grandmothers – and the urgent need to protect our own parents from this disease – propelled our family to join the Alzheimer’s Association in Walk to End Alzheimer’s. We walk because it is our greatest hope that, in the near future, no one else will have to experience this disease the way our family has.grandma-and-nanny

Our family grew up on Staten Island, New York. Surrounded by grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, we were lucky to live no more than a few blocks away from any given family member. This also meant that both of our grandmothers were very often at the dinner table with us.

When Grandma and Nanny were both diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and dementia and their presence at those meals became the after-dinner trip to the nursing home, our family began to experience what so many describe as “the long goodbye.”

For a few years after Nanny and Grandma entered nursing homes, we were able to bring them home for Sunday dinners, holidays, birthdays and anniversaries. We were just happy to have them close to us, spending precious moments together. But as the years went on and the disease progressed in each of them, removing Nanny and Grandma from their familiar day-to-day routine became detrimental to their well-being. It became increasingly clear that the women we loved and missed were with us physically, but perhaps no longer in spirit.


img_0859-1We did not despair, however. We shifted gears. Every celebration now began or ended with a visit to the nursing home.

Some of our most precious moments – both joyful and heartbreaking – happened there. Kate told Nanny about her engagement and saw a glimmer of recognition in her eyes; Paula sat with our mother as Grandma took her last breath; and our entire family surrounded our Nanny as she left us behind.grandma-and-horse

It has been almost three years since we lost our Grandma and under a year since we lost our Nanny.

While we felt the pain of their loss deeply, no one felt it more acutely than our parents, aunts and uncles.  We will never forget their daily dedication to their mothers, the profound sadness when their parent could no longer speak their name or the unbelievable joy when our Grandma or Nanny said a few words, held their hand and knew who they were.

It felt like our family had reached the end our long goodbye, but then we began to worry about the future, to the time when our parents, once the caregivers, might become the next diagnosed. That is why we walk. We walk for hope and for one more happy memory. We walk for Nanny and Grandma, our parents and millions of other families. We walk so that we will see a day without Alzheimer’s.

About the Authors: Kate Satin, Paula Caruselle and Paul Caruselle are siblings who lost their maternal grandmother Betty (“Grandma”) and paternal grandmother Anna Maria (“Nanny”) to Alzheimer’s disease. Along with Kate’s husband Russell, they are walking in Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Manhattan on October 29. View the Caruselle team page here.

 

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Sep 092016
 
steedwalk

Marilyn in Scotland

My mother Marilyn was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in her late 60s, but I recognized that something was wrong in her mid-60s. She had been displaying signs of nervousness and was more forgetful than usual. She had always been a very outgoing and confident woman who dressed very fashionably. One day I noticed that her skirt hem was hanging and that she wasn’t taking the same care in her appearance.

My mother succumbed to Alzheimer’s disease one year ago. She was 82 when she died.

Now I am in my mid-60s. After experiencing what happened to my mother, I wouldn’t want anyone else to have to go through what she did. When she began wandering and leaving their home, my stepfather couldn’t keep up with her, and she was moved to a memory care facility. While there, she broke her hip. That led to three years in bed, never walking or talking again.

Every story about Alzheimer’s is heartbreaking.

We all have to watch someone we love slowly disappear. My family wasn’t even given a respite. One year ago, my stepfather too was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Our family’s first reaction was: “Oh no, not again!” It seems like almost no one we know is unaffected by this disease in some way. That is why I walk.

I have walked in Walk to End Alzheimer’s for eight years and have raised over $35,000.

I am an artist and have put on shows in which I have donated 100% of the proceeds to the cause. I collect for Forget-Me-Not Days and traveled to Springfield, Illinois this year to implore legislators to procure more funding for the Alzheimer’s Association. I never knew that raising funds for Alzheimer’s would become my passion. I walk because my mother was my best friend. I walk because she couldn’t walk for herself. I walk because I know she would have done the same thing for me.

It feels like we have rounded a corner. It seems like Alzheimer’s is finally getting the attention it deserves.

I have faith that a cure will be found. That takes a lot of funding and research, but I believe that if everyone who has any connection to Alzheimer’s would walk and spread the word by advocating on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Association, the cure might come faster. I have rarely met anyone who hasn’t been touched by this memory-robbing disease. We need to fight for all those people who can no longer speak for themselves, like my mother and so many others. We must walk.steed

About the Author:  Together with her family and friends, Judy Steed is participating in Walk to End Alzheimer’s with her team “Marching for Marilyn.” You can visit Judy’s Walk page here.

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Sep 012016
 

I’ve been a proud team captain for Walk to End Alzheimer’s for five years. I walk for all those living with Alzheimer’s, including myself.

I started having trouble with my memory in my 40s. I worked in a doctor’s office as a nurse and suddenly I forgot how to calculate inches to feet in height. Then, I couldn’t remember what shots were given at what age. Eventually, I forgot how to spell the doctor’s name.Walkimageblog

My family doctor performed a mini dementia test and referred me to a memory center, where I was diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s. I thought of my daughter – am I going to see her get married, or see any grandchildren grow up? I’m 56 years old, and my mom is my caregiver. That is one truth I never thought was possible.

My sister reached out to the Alzheimer’s Association and I was connected with someone at my local chapter. I saw that there was a need for people who are in the early stages of dementia to meet and talk so I started the first Memory Cafe in Lancaster County. I’m also a mentor, speaking to people who are newly-diagnosed, and I raise awareness in the community by fundraising. One of the biggest ways I fundraise is through Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

I enjoy watching Walk to End Alzheimer’s continue to grow every year. Seeing donations come in that will support caregivers and those living with the disease means so much to me. Every step taken during Walk to End Alzheimer’s is a step closer to a cure, no matter where you walk. I’m lucky to use some of the skills I used as a nurse to encourage others to join me and to educate the public. And I’m not only helping them – they are helping me.

Here is what I know: Alzheimer’s is not just an old person’s disease. Alzheimer’s is not funny. Alzheimer’s is a disease of the brain, not a mental health issue. Alzheimer’s doesn’t care who you are or what you do. Alzheimer’s affects us all.

Alzheimer’s diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to stop living. You still have a lot to offer to the community and a voice (and feet!) to help bring awareness to the disease. This is why I walk to end Alzheimer’s.Mary Read 2015 ESAG Headshot

 

About the Author: On September 24, Mary Read will walk in Lancaster, Pennsylvania to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s research, care and support resources for local communities. She encourages people with Alzheimer’s and dementia to enjoy life every day. You can visit her team page here

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Sep 012016
 

image001Family, fitness and faith are all at the center of my being. I was a caregiver for 13 years for two of the most important men in my life – my fathers. Like many caregivers, I experienced the joy and heartbreak of caring for my parents. It was a journey that sometimes made me laugh and sometimes made me cry.

When my father was diagnosed with dementia after suffering from two strokes, I was concerned about his quality of life, so I moved him into my home and hired nurse assistants to help me take care of him. Eventually, God sent me an angel named Lenell Wyatt who moved into my home and took care of my Papa as if he was her Papa.

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It was a blessing to have Dad at home with me. We had a beautiful relationship. Every morning it was like waking up to sunshine.

There were many ways dementia changed my Dad, but I made sure he was always physically, mentally and spiritually stimulated. To help him develop a new norm, I took measures to focus on his wellness daily. We kept busy with senior church programs, bingo and movie nights, field trips, aquatics, art classes and tennis. We also had date nights once a week. Papa loved to go salsa dancing…well, he stood in one place snapping his fingers while the pretty girls danced around him. Every single day was full of these sunny moments.


I believe everyone can live their best life, and this includes people with dementia and Alzheimer’s – and their caregivers.

With more than 25 years in the fitness business, I have seen firsthand how having a purpose, the right mindset and setting goals can help create change. To continue the legacy of my father, I’m educating, inspiring and empowering people about dementia, whether it’s about caregiving, the emotions that come along with the disease or the financial impact it has on families. I would like to support families who have loved ones living with this disease and keep the lines of communication open so that other people don’t feel alone in their fight.
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That is why I am walking in Walk to End Alzheimer’s this year.

My Dad passed away last June. I put my head on his belly, and saw him take his last breath. He was surrounded by those that he loved, and he was ushered into glory with the lead singer from the praise and worship team singing “Amazing Grace” and “Precious Lord.” It was the greatest honor to take care of him and he lived his best life.

For my Papa and millions of others like him, I continue to work to make sure my story is heard.

I know my passion and purpose is to connect with families and friends at Walk to motivate and reach their souls! Our shared goal is a world without Alzheimer’s. Let’s put strategies in place to make that happen. Let’s walk.

 

image004About the Author: Donna Richardson is an international lifestyle and fitness expert, author and talk show host. She has starred in award-winning videos for Nike, ESPN and Beachbody, the best-selling “Buns of Steel” and now her own “Old School Dance Party Workout.” She has served on the Women’s Sports Foundation Board, the LPGA Foundation Board, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Board and as an Advisory Board Member for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. She is an Ambassador for the “Let’s Move” initiative, has taught at the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for girls and is the founder of Grow Green Get Fit, a nutritional, physical and environmental curriculum for school-aged children taught at YMCAs across the country.  Donna is the only member to serve on both President Obama’s and President Bush’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN). She was inducted into the Fitness Hall of Fame and named “One of the Most Inspirational Women in America” by Essence Magazine. Join her at the Walk in Dallas, Texas.

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Aug 192016
 

My mom has been living with younger-onset Alzheimer’s for over nine years, diagnosed when she was just 53. This is why I walk to end Alzheimer’s. This year will be my fourth Walk in honor of her and the millions of people diagnosed with this disease.

Some people mistakenly think that Alzheimer’s is a “cute” disease that happens to old people when they lose their memory.

When I posted a video on Facebook last year of my mom barely being able to move without my support during the mother-son dance at my wedding, people got a better understand how devastating Alzheimer’s can be. It isn’t cute at all. And when you see firsthand what this disease does to someone you love, it makes you want to do whatever you can to fight the disease and help wherever and whenever possible.

I’m also constantly inspired by my father, who has never wavered.IMG_7235 (1)

Dad is there taking care of my mom 24 hours a day, seven days a week. He does anything and everything you can imagine and more for her, always with a smile on his face. This is one of the many reasons I’ve found my Walk experience to be so rewarding. I do it for my mother, who has the disease, and my father, her devoted husband and caregiver.

Knowing that Alzheimer’s is the only cause of death in the top 10 in the U.S. that cannot be slowed, prevented or cured, the importance of walking and raising as much money as possible is beyond critical.

My sister and her fiancé had been involved with the Walk in D.C. and it was their example that inspired me to reply to the email asking me to help out with the San Francisco walk two years ago. I started out as the chair of the sponsorship sub-committee, and this year I was lucky enough to be asked to co-chair the San Francisco Walk. I jumped at the opportunity!

I was able to raise just over $2,500 last year, and my goal this year is to top $3,000.

The most important thing anyone can do to raise funds is just ask. You never know which of your friends, family or coworkers might have a connection to the disease – or who just want to support you because they care about you! My wife Whitney and I discovered this quickly when we began our fundraising efforts, and it left us feeling so inspired.

I walk for my mom and my dad. I also walk for me.

I walk to raise Alzheimer’s awareness as much as I walk to raise money to put an end to husbands, wives, sons and daughters having to spend their lives caring for the people they love instead of enjoying the everyday moments that make life with those family members so special. I walk so that I can live in a future without Alzheimer’s.

About the Author: Chris Reynolds is the co-chair for the San Francisco Walk to End Alzheimer’s. You can visit his team page here.

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Nov 182015
 

Laura HanniganIt’s a lot easier to say change isn’t easy than it is to experience change yourself.  I recently found this out firsthand when I said goodbye to friends, residents and coworkers at Brookdale Hillsborough, where I served as the Clare Bridge program manager for two years. In becoming the new executive director at Brookdale Hamilton, I wouldn’t be far away geographically, but away from the “family” I had grown to love.

Clare Bridge is Brookdale’s individualized and person-centered program designed to meet the specific needs of those living with Alzheimer’s and dementia. We celebrated many daily moments of success at Hillsborough, including the success of our Hillsborough Walk Team’s efforts and fundraisers.

Brookdale Hillsborough WalkOver the past three years, the Hillsborough Walk Team picked up momentum and grew from raising $600 the first year, $1,800 the next year, to $6,000 with matching gifts in 2014.

Brookdale working TogetherWalk to End Alzheimer’s is an energizing event that we all look forward to all year long. It was a chilly day this year, but our hearts were warmed by the incredible crowds and inspirational speeches, as people proudly carried team banners. We were all so honored to be part of this impressive turnout supporting the Alzheimer’s Association. Words cannot express the warm feeling we all shared and carried home in our hearts from hearing the speeches, receiving the flowers, and for sharing such a special day with so many people.

After this year’s Walk, we asked residents, their families and each other for additional fundraising ideas. Boy, did we get some good ones! Our tireless team entertained guests, prepared and served great food, decorated the building and made these events a wonderful time for all. A silent auction was our biggest hit.

Brookdale Taking in the Autction Bids

The silent auction really was a family affair.  Residents, their families and Brookdale associates donated all types of items to be auctioned off.  From hand knitted afghans to new appliances and Waterford crystal, the spirit of giving filled the community.  It was lots of fun and, at times, seriously competitive.  Our assisted living resident Roz and a Clare Bridge resident’s family helped man the silent auction, challenging others to outbid each other, and thus encouraging families to donate more to this great cause.

Brookdale Families Enjoying Silent Auction

Between our Walk and our other fundraising events, I couldn’t help but feel an overwhelming sense of pride in the Brookdale Hillsborough family. I, like so many others, have had family members who have had Alzheimer’s. I was touched by my grandmother’s experience and by the rough time my fun-loving uncle had with the disease.  When I play a tiny part in helping someone live at the highest level they can, I am so touched by the moment, and know I’m getting far more than I give.

Laura Hannigan and her Brookdale team of community associates, residents and resident families exceeded their wildest fundraising dreams for the 2015 Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

Nov 052015
 

I don’t have Alzheimer’s, and I’m not a caregiver for someone who does. I have no family members suffering from Alzheimer’s. In fact, my family has no history of Alzheimer’s disease.

My name is Wes, I’m 36 years old, and the Alzheimer’s Association has been my charity of choice for more than 10 years.wes1

“What?” “Why?”

It’s true; I’m not your “typical” advocate. But the truth is that this disease has made a lasting impression on me and in my life.

While working as a journalist in 2004, I was asked to write a story about Alzheimer’s. I didn’t know much about the disease. After completing some initial research, I felt the best way to tell the story was to interview people who were suffering from Alzheimer’s and their caregivers and care partners.

I’m not going to sugarcoat it; the interviews were heart-wrenching. At times, I cried. A grandmother was forgetting her granddaughter; a father his daughter. These wonderful and kind people were forgetting their most cherished memories and everything they once were as each day went by. The toll on their caregivers, I learned, was immense too.

Since then, the Alzheimer’s Association has been my charity of choice. Currently, I’m the marketing chair for the Miami Walk to End Alzheimer’s, and no matter where I’ve lived (Lafayette, St. Louis, Memphis and Miami), I’ve raised funds and have walked to end Alzheimer’s.

This year I had the opportunity to fly before I Walk. On July 30, as the 18th recipient of the JetBlue “Flying It Forward” ticket, I flew from Ft. Lauderdale to Chicago to visit the Alzheimer’s Association National Office. My goal was to meet the leaders who are fighting this disease and take their best practices back to the Southeast Florida chapter.

I learned about the programs the Association offers, its research efforts, and Walk to End Alzheimer’s marketing and fundraising tips. I also visited the National Contact Center, where the 24/7 free, helpline is answered.  Did you know the National Contact Center handles an average of 3,750 calls a week?! I learned a lot during my visit and I will cherish the trip for the rest of my life.

wes2Here are a few of the things I learned:

  1. Wear your Walk shirt – Walk to End Alzheimer’s shirts are not just for Walks. Wear them throughout the year, especially in high-traffic areas such as airports, sporting events and shopping malls. People will approach you and ask about your involvement and the cause and may even share their personal stories.
  2. Memorize the 24/7 Helpline – If someone approaches you with interest in or needs help from the Alzheimer’s Association, offer the 800.272.3900 24/7 Helpline! You can also print business cards with the helpline info on it so you can easily hand it out.
  3. Tell your story – Storytelling allows you to make a connection with people. Share your story to increase your Walk fundraising and raise awareness of this disease. My personal fundraising spiked when WGN TV featured my trip after I had asked people to share my story through their social networks (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.).
  4. Get creative – I have friends who always want me to join Facebook even though I’ve opposed it for years. But then I saw an opportunity: I told them that if I raised $10,000 to end Alzheimer’s, I would join, and many of them have donated!

Just as Alzheimer’s has made a lasting impression on me, I hope to make a lasting impression by continuing to join Walk every year. It’s important to note that JetBlue did not select me for the program that resulted in my visit to the Alzheimer’s Association National Office. Amy, the past recipient of the “Flying It Forward” ticket, chose me because she has two uncles who are suffering from Alzheimer’s.

So when I walk in Miami in November, I’m now Walking for them too.

About the Author: Wes Milligan is a communications advisor at FedEx Express, Latin America & Caribbean Division, where he is responsible for internal and external communications. Wes lives and works in Miami. You can visit his Walk page here.

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