Feb 162017
 
Finding My Voice in the Fight to End Alzheimer’s: A Young Advocate’s Story

I am a hospice and palliative care nursing assistant for people living with Alzheimer’s disease. I have experienced countless moments of bathing and toileting people who have forgotten what toilet paper is, and countless minutes flipping through photo albums pointing out family members, picture by picture. Most importantly, I have countless special memories of holding someone’s hand as death washes over and a sort of freedom sets in. I have been someone’s doctor, someone’s granddaughter […]

Jan 132017
 
Rings on Her Fingers

My dad and I tried to take Mom’s rings off today, but we had no success. In addition to her wedding and engagement ring, Mom wears four other rings, each one tightly hugging her fingers, so much so that even with liberal amounts of lubrication, the rings do not come off. She’s been wearing them for so long that her fingers have shaped themselves around the rings. Mom has gained weight and her fingers are […]

Dec 222016
 
Finding Joy During My First Christmas with Alzheimer’s

The holidays have long been known as the season of joy, but how do you truly define joy? As someone living with Alzheimer’s disease and approaching my first Christmas since receiving the diagnosis, I’m beginning to define joy differently than I have in previous years. While I previously found joy during the holidays in festive decorations, music, meals and parties, I’ve come to realize these are fleeting. This year, spending time with my family, making […]

Dec 132016
 
Celebrate the Season By Being True to Yourself

I was a college professor and nurse with my doctorate in education when I started having memory problems that were concerning me. Students had complained of inconsistent homework assignments, and my son Dan noticed that I was repeating myself in our phone conversations. Then one day while giving a speech in Washington D.C. about medical ethics, I totally blanked about where I was and why I was there – in the middle of my speech. […]

Nov 172016
 
Why I Walk: William’s Story

My experience with Alzheimer’s started in 2001. My grandfather (my father’s father) died of what was first described to me as senility. I was in my early 20s and thought nothing of it; people in their 80s just forgot things. It was not until 2009 or 2010 that I started to pay closer attention. We later discovered that my grandfather had had dementia. That’s when I also learned that my grandparents on my mother’s side […]

Nov 142016
 
Relief for Thousands Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

Today, there are an estimated 5.4 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease. And while most people associate the disease with old age, the fact is there are 200,000 Americans under the age of 65 living with it today. As with all forms of the disease, early-onset Alzheimer’s is a progressive, terminal disease, which cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. Since the onset can occur in people as early as in their 30s and 40s […]

Nov 102016
 
Walking for the First Survivor of Alzheimer’s

2016 marks the 5th year I have walked in Walk to End Alzheimer’s. This year, I was lucky to walk with friends and family, but there is one person I wish could walk with me – and I simultaneously realize that if she was here, I wouldn’t have the same compelling reason to walk. That person is my mom. When I was 15, my mom was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 50. […]

Alz.org main site  |  Research  |  Advocacy  |  Care and support  |  Message boards  |  Disclaimer  |  Donate  |  Contact us  |  Sign up for e-news
© 2011 Alzheimer's Association | Blog Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha