May 182009
 

This week, the Alzheimer’s Association is launching its new Early Detection campaign, “Know the 10 Signs.” We’ve asked our Early Stage Advisors to contribute some of their personal experiences recognizing the signs of Alzheimer’s. These courageous individuals have all endured the arduous process of discovering their disease and have volunteered their energy to the Alzheimer’s Association to advance the most effective step in Alzheimer’s treatment: Early Detection.

Every day this week, we’ll be posting real stories of diagnosis and the relation of each to the 10 Signs of Alzheimer’s disease. For more information on the 10 Signs, please contact the Alzheimer’s Association at 877-IS IT ALZ (877.474.8259) or visit alz.org/10signs.

  4 Responses to “Early Detection Matters”

  1. I may have early onset of Alzhiemers One neurologist says it is MCI. What is the difference?

  2. I'm a provider of Alz services in Atlantic, IA, and in 2005 had the opportunity to visit several Alz programs, researchers, and community resources in and around Oslo, Norway. One ingenious resource of the national Alz organization in Norway was their creation of a support group for persons newly diagnosed with Alz. It was not for the family members but for the persons with Alz themselves! Such a service helps the newly diagnosed to grapple with the emotional implications of their diagnosis as well as helping loved ones because it helps the person with Alz process to accept their diagnosis. If anyone would be interested in starting such a program with me, please contact me 712-243-9463.

  3. Interesting post. A conclusive diagonosis needs to be made by a medical professional but there are many symptoms that people can look for. Also while there are no proven preventions keeping an active body and mind has been shown to slow down the onset of alzheimers in those diagnosed with it. http://www.alzheimerssupport.net/

  4. interesting . Thanks for the info.http://alzheimersandmomblog.blogspot.com/

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